Time for Glossary!~

HTTP – Stands for “HyperText Transfer Protocol.” This is the protocol used to transfer data over the World Wide Web. That’s why all Web site addresses begin with “http://”. Whenever you type a URL into your browser and hit Enter, your computer sends an HTTP request to the appropriate Web server. The Web server, which is designed to handle HTTP requests, then sends to you the requested HTML page.

Head – The first section of code (page source) in most HTML documents, usually containing the page’s title, META description, META keywords, and more. The code in the header is encompassed by the following tags: <HEAD>, </HEAD>.

Body – The body element defines the document’s body.

The body element contains all the contents of an HTML document, such as text, hyperlinks, images, tables, lists, etc.

DOCTYPE – A file that defines how applications interpreting a document should present the content. It is used in HTML , XML , and other Markup languages. A DOCTYPE is a means of specifying what syntax a web page uses. Include a document type declaration at the beginning of a document that refers to a published DTD (e.g., the strict HTML 4.0 DTD). The document type declaration should be appropriate to the markup language you are using. It should appear at the very beginning of an HTML document in order to identify the content of the document as conforming to a particular HTML DTD specification.

CSS – Short for Cascading Style Sheets, a new feature being added to HTML that gives both Web site developers and users more control over how pages are displayed. With CSS, designers and users can create style sheets that define how different elements, such as headers and links, appear. These style sheets can then be applied to any Web page.

The term cascading derives from the fact that multiple style sheets can be applied to the same Web page. CSS was developed by the W3C.

WWW – Stands for “World Wide Web.” It is important to know that this is not a synonym for the Internet. The World Wide Web, or just “the Web,” as ordinary people call it, is a subset of the Internet. The Web consists of pages that can be accessed using a Web browser. The Internet is the actual network of networks where all the information resides. Things like Telnet, FTP, Internet gaming, Internet Relay Chat (IRC), and e-mail are all part of the Internet, but are not part of the World Wide Web. The Hyper-Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the method used to transfer Web pages to your computer. With hypertext, a word or phrase can contain a link to another Web site. All Web pages are written in the hyper-text markup language (HTML), which works in conjunction with HTTP.

Domain name – This is the name that identifies an Web site. For example, “microsoft.com” is the domain name of Microsoft’s Web site. A single Web server can serve Web sites for multiple domain names, but a single domain name can point to only one machine. For example, Apple Computer has Web sites at http://www.apple.com, http://www.info.apple.com, and store.apple.com. Each of these sites could be served on different machines.

Then there are domain names that have been registered, but are not connected to a Web server. The most common reason for this is to have e-mail addresses at a certain domain name without having to maintain a Web site. In these cases, the domain name must be connected to a machine that is running a mail server.

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